This week in the gospel project

Hero's of Faith 

Unit 33: Session 6

Teaching on 05.27.2018

It is common to think of faith as something that is just within us—trust and confidence in God. While that is surely part of it, faith doesn’t stop there. Faith starts inside of us and always leads to action.

33_6_MainPoint-page-001.jpg

The writer of the Book of Hebrews wanted to explain the fullness of faith to the early Jewish Christians. One of the best ways he could do this was to walk through examples of how men and women in the Old Testament had proven to be faithful. The result is Hebrews 11, often known as the Hall of Faith. 

Abel had faith when he gave an offering to God, and God accepted his offering. Noah had faith. He believed God when God told him to build an ark to rescue his family. 

Abraham had faith when God called him to leave his home. Abraham’s wife Sarah had faith when she trusted God to give her a family even though she was too old to have children. Isaac, Jacob, Joseph, and Moses had faith too. Rahab had faith when she hid the Israelite spies in Jericho. 

All of these people trusted God, and so did many others. Having faith was not easy. Many suffered, and they died before God’s greatest promise—the arrival of Jesus—came true, but they believed that God had a wonderful plan. God was pleased with them because they trusted Him.

This week, share the examples of these heroes of faith to help your kids understand faith in action. We can and should learn from these examples; that is why God gave them to us in Hebrews 11. However, emphasize that every person in this list was a sinner in need of salvation. Each of these heroes needed a greater hero. Point your kids to the perfect hero who rescues us from sin: Jesus.

The Bible gives examples of people who had faith, but the true hero of the Bible is Jesus. Jesus looked forward to the joy that would come because of the cross. Because of Jesus, the things the faithful people in the Bible looked forward to will come true. We know that Jesus will come back one day because God always keeps His promises.

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

33_5_BibleStoryPictures-page-001.jpg

A Cheerful Giver

Unit 33: Session 5

Teaching on 5.20.2018 

Paul had written a letter (1 Corinthians) addressing several sins that were being tolerated in the church at Corinth. The letter had been a risk. The Corinthians may have rejected Paul, but they did not.

Paul wrote 2 Corinthians to celebrate what God had done in the church and to call on them for help. The church in Jerusalem was in desperate need of help, so Paul was collecting money from the other churches on their behalf.

Paul encouraged the Corinthians to be generous. He told them about the churches in Macedonia. Macedonia was an area north of Corinth. The Christians there were suffering, and they did not have a lot of wealth. Nevertheless, they had joy and gave as much as they could to help others.

Paul encouraged the believers at Corinth to give too. Giving is one way we can show we love God. God is generous to us, so we can be generous to others. Jesus was rich; He had glory and honor in heaven. But He gave that up and became poor by coming to earth to help sinners. 

Jesus did this so that we, who had nothing, could become rich. Now we have salvation and eternal life in Jesus. As a result, Paul wanted the Corinthians to give generously and joyfully, out of gratitude for what God has done.

Your kids may feel like the churches in Macedonia who had little to give, but encourage them the same way Paul encouraged the church in Corinth. It is not the amount that we give that glorifies God—it is our level of generosity and joy when we give. 

God has been merciful and generous to us. He gave us the greatest gift—His own Son. Jesus showed us what generosity looks like when He gave up His life to save us from sin. Because of Jesus, we can be merciful and generous to others.

Caution kids not to give out of duty but out of gratitude. God loves a cheerful giver. Help kids find ways they can give—whether time or money or talents—to advance the work of the gospel in your city, your nation, and the world.

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

FAMILY STARTING POINTS

Babies and Toddlers

  • God helps us love Him. 
  • God gives us everything
  • Believers give to the church 
  • We give to the church to help people hear the good news

Preschool

  • Who changes us? God changes us to be like Jesus
  • God wants us to give to others

Kids

  • Who changes us? The Holy Spirit changes us to be like Jesus
  • God is generous to us so we can be generous to others

This Week in the Gospel Project

The Armor of God

Unit 33: Session 4

Teaching on 5.13.2018

Paul knew that following Jesus is difficult. After Paul met Jesus on the road to Damascus, his life was turned upside down and he was never the same. Paul spent the rest of his life struggling and suffering to advance the very gospel that he had denied and fought against before his conversion.

Paul was in prison when he wrote his letter to the believers at the church in Ephesus. Paul knew firsthand that the life of a believer is a battle—an ongoing fight. But Paul didn’t see life as a fight against the Romans, those who had thrown him in prison, or those who opposed the gospel. The battle is against evil.

At the conclusion of his letter, Paul used a Roman soldier’s armor as a picture of how we are to prepare ourselves to fight the battle against evil. Believers are to carry God’s truth, righteousness, and peace wherever we go. Likewise, we are to hold fast to our faith, salvation, and the Word of God. When we are fully protected by this armor of God, we are ready for any battle. 

In addition to wearing the armor of God, Paul called on believers to pray at all times. Paul wanted to remind believers that even with the armor of God, we still need to rely on God to protect us and to win the fight against evil.

Paul told believers to be ready to fight a spiritual battle each and every day. People and powers who are against God will be against us too. But Jesus died and rose from the dead. He had victory over evil. We can fight the battle against evil, knowing Jesus already won the war.

This week, show your kids all that God has given them to help them fight against evil. Emphasize that God never intends for us to fight in our own power. We are to rely on His power. 

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

New Flyte Unit

flyte.jpg

FLYTE: FAITH. LIFE. TOGETHER

Respect is an issue every preteen and ever family address through many of life's situations. Understanding the biblical definition and expectation of respect is vital in preteens' spiritual and emotional growth.

Over the next four weeks, your preteen will be exploring the idea of respect through the LifeWay Preteens FLYTE curriculum. Specifically, we’ll be attempting to answer several questions about the topic:

May 6th: What Is Respect and Why Should I Give It?
Bible passage: Philippians 2:3-11

May 13th: Do They Deserve My Respect?
Bible passage: 1 Peter 2:11-17; Acts 10:9-34; 11:1-17

May 20th: Why Respect Those Who Are Different?
Bible passage: Luke 10:25-37

May 27th: How Can I Earn Respect?
Bible passage: Luke 2:1-20

The purpose of these sessions is to establish for preteens several biblical truths: God wants preteens to cooperate and work willingly with others. Because God values all nationalities and cultures, preteens should respect and value each person.

As you talk with your preteen about these matters, your first priority should be to help him or her understand that he or she can show a person respect even if that person's ideas or actions are different.

I would encourage you to help your preteen memorize Philippians 2:3-4. Be prepared to discuss with your family the story of Joseph in Genesis 39 and what is required of your preteen in order for him or her to earn respect. As you do this, focus on your preteen taking personal responsibility for his or her choices and their consequences. It is my prayer that your family will set an example to others with the way you respect each other.

[[Fill in any other class information here.]]

Sincerely,

[[Teacher Name]]

This week in the gospel Project

Fruit of the Spirit 

Unit 33: Session 3

Teaching on 5.6.2018

33_3_BibleStoryPictures-page-001.jpg

When we trust in Jesus, we become children of God and the gospel changes us. Our thinking changes so we can understand what pleases God and know His will. But gospel transformation doesn’t stop there. The gospel also changes how we live each day. 

In his letter to the Galatians, Paul described the fruit of the flesh—what a person’s life looks like apart from Christ: anger, jealousy, selfishness, impurity, strife, and similar things. Paul shared that people who live like this will not enter God’s kingdom because this behavior reveals the condition of the person’s heart. These behaviors are the fruit of that person’s sinful heart.

Then Paul told the believers in the Galatian church how to recognize that God is working in someone’s life. He contrasted the fruit of the flesh with the fruit of the Spirit—what a person’s life looks like in Christ: love, joy, peace, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control. This is the fruit produced in a person whose heart is changed by Christ. 

As you share the fruit of the Spirit with your kids this week, be careful to help them see that this fruit is produced by the Holy Spirit working in them. It is not called the fruit of the Christian. Our response to the fruit of the Spirit should not be to think of ways we can be more loving, joyful, peaceful, or kind. That is mistakenly believing the fruit is produced by us! When we trust in Jesus, the Holy Spirit begins to change us.

When we trust in Jesus, the Holy Spirit begins to change us. Paul told the believers in the Galatian church how to recognize that God is working in someone’s life. People who are saved by Jesus become more like Him, and the Holy Spirit gives them power to say no to sin and to live in a way that pleases God.

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

This week in the gospel Project

A Transformed Mind

Unit 33: Session 2

Teaching on 4.29.2018

All of the letters Paul wrote follow the same basic outline. The first part of each letter focuses on important doctrines: the gospel. The second part of each letter then explains how those doctrines can and should shape how we live every day: gospel transformation. 

When it comes to Romans, the first eleven chapters are Paul’s explanation of the gospel, while the final five chapters center on how that gospel changes us. Romans 12:1-2 is the hinge linking these two sections together. 

Paul urges believers to keep in mind the mercies of God. God’s grace, mercy, and kindness led Him to provide Jesus to pay our penalty for sin so that we might be adopted into God’s family. Then Paul helps us look forward by summarizing the impact the gospel should have on us. We are to be living sacrifices that please God. How can we do that? The answer is in Romans 12:2. We are to be transformed by the renewing of our minds. A renewed mind transformed by the Holy Spirit will help us see what pleases God, what His will is. 

God wants us to show friendship and love to one another. As believers, we all belong to Jesus. His death and resurrection bring us together. The Holy Spirit changes the way we think and live so we can love one another as God has loved us. 

The gospel first changes the heart and mind. Then, as a result, the gospel changes how a person lives. This is how we please and glorify God. As you share with your kids this week, remind them of how important gospel transformation is. Help them to see that they cannot please God by their own effort—and God doesn’t want them to try.

Help kids understand what it means to rest in the gospel—in who they have been made in Christ Jesus—and how to allow the Holy Spirit to work in their minds, hearts, and their actions. Share that one of the ways God transforms our minds is by us reading His Word, and encourage them to spend time reading the Bible this week.

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

 

Woodlands Kid's Carnival

woodlandskidscarnival.jpg

We're so excited to host the first ever Woodlands Kid's Carnival on May 10th, from 5-8pm.

Mark you calendars!

This night is all about having a great time with friends. Everyone is invited, but if you're a regular Woodlands Church attendee, your ticket for attendance is a friend!

This night will feature over 60 different games and a HUGE prize table. From simple table games to great carnival classics, there's something for everyone! Drop in any time with your family (parents, please be present with your kids), get 10 "Carnival Bucks" to spend on any game, and earn tickets for playing the games. Spend the tickets on great prizes, food, candy and even more fun!

If you want to volunteer to help, please click here. 

This week in the Gospel Project

Children of God

Unit 33: Session 1

Teaching on 4.22.2108

Rome was one of the most important cities in Paul’s day. Paul understood that it was essential that the church in the capital of the Roman Empire be anchored in the gospel. Unlike many of the other churches we read about in the New Testament, Paul didn’t help plant the church in Rome; in fact, he hadn’t even visited yet. Paul was planning his first visit to this important church when he wrote a letter to make sure the believers there properly understood the gospel. 

The Book of Romans contains one of the clearest explanations of the gospel in the Bible. Paul opens his letter by explaining the sin problem that plagues us all. He then moves on to share how Jesus’ perfect life, death, and resurrection was sufficient to save people who trust in Jesus.  

33_1_BibleStoryPictures-page-001.jpg

In Romans 5, people are described as helpless, ungodly, sinners, and enemies apart from Christ. Then, in chapter 8, Paul begins to show how having a relationship with Jesus changes us. He describes believers as children of God in Christ. That’s quite a change! 

The gospel doesn’t just spare us from the ultimate consequences of our sin. The gospel doesn’t just make us neutral to God. Because of the gospel, we are adopted by God and have the right and privilege to call God our loving Father. Gently and lovingly explain that God is our perfect Father, a Father who is always there for us and who loves us unconditionally because of His Son, Jesus. Being children of God means we have nothing to fear. Our relationship with God is secure for eternity.

God is changing believers to be more like Jesus. We are God’s children—freed from sin, given power to do what is right, and adopted into God’s family. Because Jesus died on the cross, God the Father welcomes us and promises a future with Him forever.

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

This week in the Gospel Project

Paul's Letters to Church Leaders 

Unit 31: Session 5

Teaching on 4.15.2018

As the early church expanded outside Jerusalem, new churches were planted in various cities. Each church needed godly leaders to help it grow and stay true to the gospel. Paul understood this need, which is why he wrote letters to some of the leaders in the church. Two of these leaders were Timothy and Titus. Timothy was Paul’s friend. He had traveled with Paul and helped him. Now Timothy was a leader at the church in Ephesus.

Titus was a Gentile believer. He had traveled with Paul too. Now Titus was on the island of Crete to help train more church leaders. Paul wrote to give Timothy and Titus advice, and he gave instructions for all the church leaders.

Paul warned Timothy and Titus that being a leader was difficult at times, but God had chosen them to be leaders. Their role as leaders put them in a position to serve God. Paul hoped that recognizing this would help them persevere and live in a way that pleased Christ. 

As you share with your kids this week, help them see the value in God’s gift of church leaders. Look for ways to support your leaders so that your kids value them, love them, and respect them. Consider ways your family can encourage your leaders. 

At the same time, emphasize that God is at work in your kids and that they too might be leaders in the church one day—perhaps one day soon. Help your kids see that being a leader is a great privilege to help point others to the gospel. 

Finally, be sure that your kids understand that church leaders do not lead on their own. All church leaders follow the leadership of Jesus, who was a servant-leader to us. He gave His life so that we could be forgiven of our sin.  

Paul wrote to give Timothy and Titus advice and to help all church leaders know how to lead God’s people. Church leaders help believers know what is true, and they serve the church by following the example of Jesus, who served us by dying on the cross for our sins.

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

This week in the gospel Project

Love One Another

Unit 31: Session 4

Teaching on 4.8.2018

The apostle John had been one of Jesus’ closest friends. Along with Peter and James, John was part of the innermost core of Jesus’ disciples. John even referred to himself in his Gospel as “the one whom Jesus loved.”

It is not surprising that 50 years after Jesus returned to heaven, John wrote a letter to help believers understand who Jesus is. At the center of John’s message was one key theme: love. 

John wrote that God is love, and if believers truly love God, then we will love one another. Our love for one another should be so deep that we are willing to lay down our lives for one another just as Jesus did for us. It is this deep, genuine love that will cause the world to understand the reality of the gospel. 

Love is misunderstood and distorted in our culture today, and your kids may have been impacted by this in some way. Your kids may see love as just a feeling, as something temporary, or as something that has to be earned. This session is the perfect opportunity to expose the world’s myths about love and remind your kids of the truth about God’s love.

Remind kids that Jesus’ love for them is unconditional and unending. It is not just a feeling. Jesus’ love for us is proven by His death on the cross to rescue them from sin. We can love others because God loved us first.

John wrote a letter to teach believers in the church about the importance of showing love. Love is more than feelings or words—it is an action. Jesus showed God’s love for us when He died on the cross to rescue people from sin.

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

Easter Sunday

Easter Sunday Lesson

Teaching on 4.1.2018

This week all school-aged children will be together as we celebrate the Resurrection of Christ and what it means! Drop off and pick up will be in Celebration Square.

God’s law for the people was plain. Read Deuteronomy 6:5. But God’s people, and all people, have broken the law. We have loved other things more than we love God. That is sin.

Jesus’ purpose for coming to earth was to save us from our sin. (Matt. 1:21) Why did Jesus have to die? Why couldn’t He just say, “You are forgiven”? God is just and requires due payment for sin. To simply forgive sin without requiring a payment would be unjust. According to God’s Word, the payment of sin is death. (Rom. 6:23) But not only is God just, He is also loving. That is why Jesus was willing to die in our place.

Jesus came to live and die to show God’s love to us (Rom. 5:7-8) so that whoever believes in Him might not perish but have eternal life. (John 3:16) Jesus came to die so that we would be forgiven. (Eph. 1:7) Jesus came to die to bring us to God. (1 Pet. 3:18)

Jesus died on the cross to satisfy the wrath of God toward sin. Jesus’ resurrection proved that God was satisfied with Jesus’ sacrifice, and forgiveness and life are found in Him. (See 1 Cor. 15:17.) If Jesus had died but not been raised up, He would have been like military leaders who died without a throne. (Acts 5:33-37) But Jesus conquered death, just as He said He would. (John 2:19-21)

Jesus’ resurrection gives us hope for our resurrection. (Rom. 6:5) Romans 8:11 says that the same Spirit that raised Jesus from the dead will raise our bodies to life.

Jesus’ crucifixion and resurrection are not the end of the story, but the center of it. Everything that was written about Jesus in the Old Testament and spoken by the prophets was coming true. As you teach your kids this Bible story, emphasize the gospel: the good news of who Jesus is and what He has done

The crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus is the center of the gospel. We deserve to die because of our sin, but Jesus died in our place. He was the blood sacrifice made once and for all for the forgiveness of sin. God was pleased with Jesus’ sacrifice and raised Jesus from the dead to reign as King over all creation. We are forgiven only through Jesus. (Acts 4:12)

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

 

This week in the Gospel Project

The Triumphant Entry

Unit 32: Session 1

Teaching on 3.25.2018

The Sunday before Easter is Palm Sunday—the day Jesus entered Jerusalem as the King of kings the week of Passover. Many of God’s people traveled to Jerusalem for Passover. Jesus and His disciples traveled to Jerusalem as well. Near Bethphage (BETH fayj) and Bethany near the Mount of Olives, Jesus sent two disciples ahead into a village.

Jesus told them, “You will find a young donkey tied there. No one has ever sat on it. Untie it and bring it here. If anyone says to you ‘Why are you doing this?’ say, ‘The Lord needs it.’” Jesus would fulfill Zechariah’s prophecy: “Look, your King is coming to you … humble and riding on a donkey” (Zech. 9:9).

Jesus made a spectacular entrance into the city. He rode a donkey, and people laid branches and their robes on the ground in front of Him. The people welcoming Jesus into Jerusalem believed He was the promised Messiah, but they expected Him to overthrow Roman oppression and set up an earthly throne. Jesus sent a different message.

The next day, Jesus entered the temple and turned over the tables of the money changers and those selling doves. Jesus referred to Isaiah 56:7, declaring that His kingship would not just be over the Jews but over all people. While Jesus was in the temple, He healed the blind and the lame. Jesus’ actions declared, “I am not just your King; I am also your God” (Isa. 35:4-6).

Finally, the priests and the scribes heard the children in the temple worshiping Jesus as their King. “Do You hear what these children are saying?” they asked. Jesus replied, quoting Psalm 8:2. Jesus gladly received their praise because He was worthy of their praise. Jesus is the Son of God who came to overthrow sin and set up an eternal throne. 

As you prepare for and celebrate Easter, help your kids connect the dots between God’s promises of a Messiah and Jesus’ coming. Help them understand why Jesus came: to save the world from sin!

During Jesus’ triumphal entry, the people welcomed Him as King. Jesus was the Messiah spoken about by the prophet Zechariah: “Look, your King is coming to you; He is righteous and victorious, humble and riding on a donkey, on a colt, the foal of a donkey” (Zechariah 9:9). One day, Jesus will return to earth on a white horse as King over everything. (Revelation 19:11)

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

A Missional Vision for Summer 2018

38fd7dc3-09bd-4796-8505-f5ad2275d27b.jpg

Families at Woodlands Church, 

Do you know the kids and families in your neighborhood? Do your kids have friends in your neighborhood? Have you thought about ways to share about Jesus with those families and kids this summer?

We have a story to tell, and we have an opportunity to introduce friends and families throughout our neighborhoods to Jesus this summer. We want to encourage each family to think missionally about your neighborhood! And we want to give you an easy path to make that happen. There are four options we want you to consider for summer 2018:

Bring neighborhood friends to the Woodlands Kid’s Carnival on May 10th, 2018.

            For the first time ever, we’re hosting a public Woodlands Carnival on Thursday, May 10th. Kids from the church are invited, as long as they bring a neighborhood or school friend with them! This fun carnival features tons of games and prizes, and everyone who attends gets 10 free Carnival Dollars to spend at this free event. Have a great evening; bring kids anytime between 6pm-8pm and expect a great evening!

Host a neighborhood cookout.

            One great way to get kids and families into your home is to host a neighborhood cookout. We’re putting together cookout totes to help make hosting a cookout as easy as possible. Just let us know the date you’re looking at, and we’ll provide the lawn games, cooking suggestions and recipes and even some money to help with the cost if you’d like.

Host a 5 Day Club.

            Child Evangelism Fellowship has been holding 5 Day Clubs for decades throughout Wisconsin. Highly trained teens will come to your home during the summer and lead a mini-VBS, right in your backyard. It’s fun, exciting and an incredible way to reach out to your neighborhood. We’re excited to partner with CEF to impact central Wisconsin this summer. We’re praying for 10 families interested in hosting 5 Day Clubs this summer.

Invite neighborhood kids and friends to VBS July 29th-August 3rd.

            Everything we do missionally this summer will point families and kids to VBS and Camp ZIP during the final week of July. The church will be packed with volunteers, kids, tons of fun and lots of the gospel. We’ll also tie VBS into our weekly Kids programs at Woodlands Church, and encourage families to check them out!

What to do now:

Start praying about adopting a missional mindset toward your neighborhood and friends and families this summer. 

Interested in information about next steps? Use the form below to let us know!

Name *
Name
What Are You Potentially Interested In?

This week in the Gospel Project

31_2_BibleStoryPictures-page-001.jpg

The Church was Divided

Unit 31: Session 2

Teaching on 3.11.18

Paul helped start the church in Corinth, a city in southern Greece, during his second missionary journey. Corinth was known for its wickedness. If any city needed a church, this was it. Paul remained in Corinth for about 18 months and then continued traveling to share the gospel and plant more churches.

Six years later, Paul received word from Chloe, a believer in Corinth, that the church there was struggling. The church was fractured and openly engaging in various sins. Some believers were even denying the resurrection! This news surely troubled Paul, so he sat down to write a letter to the church.

One of the first issues Paul addressed was the church’s division. Even if he could help resolve the other issues, a divided church would never be healthy and impact the city the way it needed to. According to Chloe’s report, several factions had formed in the church. Some claimed to follow Paul. Others Apollos. Others Peter. And some even claimed to follow Jesus, which wasn’t as good as it sounded. This group was most likely simply trying to sound more spiritual than the others.

Paul told the Corinthian believers that they should not be divided; they should all be one because of their shared faith in Jesus. Jesus isn’t divided, and He alone died on the cross for them. Paul’s message was clear: the gospel does not divide believers, it unites them.

Paul told believers in the Corinthian church to come together because of the gospel of Jesus. He reminded them that Jesus saves sinners. Because of Jesus and what He has done, believers can humbly come together as one body.


We all—our kids included—are experts in finding ways to divide ourselves. Sin and selfishness divide, but Jesus and the gospel unite. God designed the church to show what true unity among a beautifully diverse people looks like. This week, pray that the message Paul shared with the Corinthian believers takes root in your heart and in the hearts of your kids. Pray that God would break down the barriers we create and bring your kids together as brothers and sisters in Christ.

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

This week in the Gospel Project

Paul Confronted Peter

Unit 31: Session 1

Teaching on 3.4.2017

Peter—one of Jesus’ original disciples—had grown up in a culture where the Jews believed that God only cared about them, not the Gentiles or non-Jews. 

Most of the Jews looked down on the Gentiles and refused to even associate with them because Jews believed Gentiles were unclean; Gentiles didn’t live the right way to please God. Any Jew who did associate with Gentiles did so at the risk of being ridiculed by his own people.

After Jesus’ resurrection and ascension, God shared with Peter that He loved not only the Jews, but the Gentiles as well. (Acts 10:9-16) Peter took to heart this message from God and began associating with Gentiles, even eating with Gentile believers. That is, until some Jewish believers came around. When he was among Jews, Peter did not eat with the Gentiles and even told them they were supposed to follow certain Jewish laws. But he knew that was not true! Peter also led Barnabas, known for encouraging believers and bringing them together, into acting the same way.

When the apostle Paul learned about this, he confronted Peter in person. Paul reminded Peter that they both knew that God accepts people not based on how they live but by faith. (Rom. 3:21-22) Peter’s actions contradicted that core gospel message.

Paul shared this story with the believers in Galatia (a major province of Rome in modern Turkey) to remind them—and us—of the same truth. Salvation is not based on ethnicity or external obedience to the law. Salvation comes from faith in Jesus Christ, a faith that is freely available to people of every tongue, tribe, and nation. 

Peter was wrong to separate himself from the Gentiles. The gospel is for everyone, and we should show love to everyone. Paul reminded Peter that only Jesus can save people from sin. God accepts people who have faith in Jesus, not people who try to earn salvation on their own.


As you talk to your kids this week, encourage them not to wonder if they have what it takes to be saved. Salvation is found in Jesus. Remind them that because God loves all people, we—in Jesus—can love all people too.

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

This week in the Gospel Project

Paul's Third Journey

30_5_MainPoint-page-001.jpg

Unit 30: Session 5

Teaching on 2.25.18

Paul’s third missionary journey was unlike his first two because he didn’t set out to plant churches. Instead, his mission was to encourage and strengthen existing churches. Paul wrote letters to the churches, but he knew some guidance was best given in person. 

Paul’s journey began when he traveled to the city of Corinth. To make a living, Paul was a tentmaker. Paul became friends with two other tentmakers in Corinth: a man named Aquila and his wife, Priscilla. In his business dealings, Paul was able to share the gospel with many people. The church in Corinth grew.

Paul took Aquila and Priscilla with him to Ephesus. Ephesus was a thriving city in the Roman Empire. Aquila and Priscilla stayed in Ephesus while Paul traveled to other churches and encouraged the believers. While Paul traveled, Aquila and Priscilla interacted with a Jewish believer named Apollos. Apollos was a leader in the early church, and Aquila and Priscilla helped him better understand about Jesus and the Scriptures. Apollos went on to greatly help other believers by showing through Scripture that Jesus is the Messiah.

The Holy Spirit led Paul to go to Jerusalem. This wasn’t an easy call to obey. The Spirit revealed to Paul that imprisonment and suffering awaited in Jerusalem. (See Acts 20:23.) Hadn’t Paul done enough? He had spent years preaching the gospel, and many people believed. Wasn’t now a good time for Paul to retire comfortably on a beach somewhere? 

But Paul did not cling to his own life. God helped Paul preach with courage even when he was in danger. Paul boarded the ship to Jerusalem, uncertain of the future but certain of the goodness and grace of the Lord Jesus.

As Paul traveled on his third missionary journey, he used every opportunity to tell people the good news about Jesus and to help the church. Paul was dedicated to Jesus, who called him to do the work of sharing the gospel.

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

This week in the gospel project

Paul Preached in Europe

Unit 30: Session 5

Teaching on 2.18.2018

Paul and Silas had been released from prison in Philippi (FIH lih pigh). Before leaving the city, they met with believers at Lydia’s house and encouraged them. Then they traveled to Thessalonica and stopped at the synagogue to explain to the Jews that Jesus is the Messiah. A large number of Greeks and influential women believed in Jesus.

Before long, Jews in the city became jealous and forced Paul and Silas out of the city. Even though the Jews opposed Paul’s preaching, the number of believers in Thessalonica grew and the church there was established.

Paul made his way through Berea, where people heard the gospel and believed. The Jews from Thessalonica followed him and caused trouble, so Paul went to Athens. Athens—about 200 miles from Berea—was a cultural center. People in Athens loved to hear about and study the latest ideas. The Jews and the philosophers in the city were interested in what Paul had to say, but Paul was troubled by what he saw. Athens was full of idols to every kind of god. There was even an altar to an unknown god.

The people obviously had a religious desire. Paul knew that their hunger for God could be satisfied—in Jesus. Paul began preaching, telling the people that they worshiped a god they did not know. He said that people can know God! God made the world and everything in it! “We ought not to think that God is like gold or silver or stone, an image formed by the art and imagination of man,” Paul said.

Then Paul told them about Jesus and how God wanted them to turn away from their sins. Some people made fun of Paul, but others believed. Paul explained God’s plan of salvation. 

The men of Athens worshiped a false god whom they did not know. Paul explained to the men God’s plan of salvation. He said that God is not like the Greek idols. Only God deserves our worship! Paul talked about Jesus and the resurrection. All people can know God because Jesus took the punishment for sin that separates people from God.

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

This week in the gospel Project

Paul's Second Journey

Unit 30: Session 4

Teaching on 2.11.18

Paul was back at the church of Antioch in Syria. The church had sent out Paul and Barnabas to preach the gospel to Jews and Gentiles in places like Lystra and Derbe. Then they returned to the church of Antioch. Some time passed, and Paul wanted to return to some of the cities he visited on his first journey to see how the new believers were doing.

Silas accompanied Paul on his second missionary journey. The pair traveled through Syria and Cilicia (sih-LISH-ih-uh), encouraging believers and strengthening churches. The number of believers in the churches increased daily.

The Lord called Paul and Silas to go to Macedonia, so they obeyed. Two major events happened while Paul was in Macedonia. First, a woman named Lydia became a believer. Paul and Silas had gone to the river to pray. They spoke to the women at the river. God opened Lydia’s heart to the good news of the gospel.

Then, a jailer became a believer. This happened when Paul and Silas were thrown into prison after Paul commanded a fortune-telling spirit to come out of a slave girl. Late at night, an earthquake rocked the prison. The prisoners could have escaped, but they stayed where they were.

This was a huge relief to the jailer. Had the prisoners escaped, the jailer would have been punished. In fact, the jailer was ready to kill himself when Paul shouted, “We are all here!” The jailer asked Paul and Silas how to be saved. They told him, “Believe in the Lord Jesus, and you will be saved.” The man believed and was baptized.

Lydia, the jailer, and many others were saved because they heard the gospel and believed in Jesus. Paul and Silas preached the same message to all people, no matter who they were: “Believe in the Lord Jesus and you will be saved.”

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

New Flyte Unit

Flyte: Faith. Life. Together

For the next four weeks, our preteens will be using the LifeWay FLYTE curriculum to learn what the Bible says about families. We firmly believe in supporting the role of a parent, and this unit would be a great opportunity for discussions with your preteen about the unique and special calling God has for your family. 

The Bible study focus for this unit is the story of Joseph, a familiar story to many preteens. During this unit, they will be digging past the surface facts of the story to take an in-depth look at Joseph’s family dynamics. Preteens will analyze the factors that caused problems in his family, identify the ways Joseph handled those challenges according to God’s plan, and learn to apply those strategies in their own families. Specifically, preteens will study the following:

2.4: What Is a Perfect Family?

Bible passage: Genesis 37:1-11

2.11: Is My Family Broken? 

Bible passage: Genesis 37:12-36

2.18: Is There Hope for My Family?

Bible passage: Genesis 40-45

2.25: How Can My Family Work Together?

Bible passage: Genesis 50:15-21

The memory passage for this unit is Psalm 133:1: “How good and pleasant it is when brothers live together in harmony!” Over the next four weeks, encourage your preteen to share what he or she has learned about harmony within families. Initiate honest conversations about the strengths and weaknesses in your own family, and be open to your preteen’s insight.

We hope this unit is one that will benefit the whole family. Please contact us if you would like additional help or resources for special challenges your family is facing or ways strengthen your family bonds.

This Week in the Gospel Project

The Message: Christ Alone

Unit 30: Session 3

Teaching on 2.4.2018

30_3_BibleStoryPictures-page-001.jpg

The church in Antioch praised God for His grace to Paul on his first missionary journey. Though Paul and Barnabas were strongly opposed in some places, many people heard the gospel and believed. Paul and Barnabas took the gospel to both Jews and Gentiles. But a problem arose when some Christians began saying that the new followers of Jesus—the Gentile believers—needed to obey the Law of Moses in order to be right with God.

Paul and Barnabas debated this issue with other church leaders in Jerusalem. They met together to answer a tough question: Can a person be saved by faith alone or was something more needed? When Paul addressed the council, he insisted that God saves Gentiles the same way He saves Jews: through the grace of the Lord Jesus. 

Paul testified to the things God had done among the Gentiles. God had given Gentiles the Holy Spirit. James cited the prophets Amos and Isaiah in support. The group agreed that because of Jesus’ death and resurrection, He alone is all we need to be saved. They also agreed that they should not make salvation more difficult for Gentiles by adding unnecessary rules.

The church chose two men—Judas and Silas—to go with Paul and Barnabas to the church at Antioch. They wrote a letter for the Gentile believers there, encouraging them and giving them instructions for how to live as followers of Christ.

The church leaders met in Jerusalem to answer a tough question: Can a person be saved by faith alone or was something more needed? The early church agreed that because of Jesus’ death and resurrection, He alone is all we need to be saved.

The message for the Gentile believers was important: Whether Jew or Gentile, salvation comes only through faith in Christ. No one is saved by the law but by grace alone. Emphasize to your kids that, while the Bible does give us plenty of instruction for how to live, sinners are made right with God only by the grace of Jesus. Salvation is a gift. To receive this gift, Jesus is all we need.

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

Copyright © 2017 - Woodlands Church
190 Hoover Ave, Plover Wi 54467 (715-341-0800)