This week in Sunday Kids

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Jacob and Rebekah

Unit 3: Session 2

Teaching on 11. 18.2018

When Isaac and Rebekah sent Jacob away from his home in the promised land of Canaan to escape the wrath of his brother Esau, Rebekah expected him to be gone for a few days—just until Esau calmed down. (Gen. 27:44) But days and then weeks and then months passed; Jacob was with Laban for twenty years. (Gen. 31:38)

Before Jacob left home, Isaac blessed him and instructed him to find a wife among his relatives. And that’s what Jacob did. On his way to Laban’s house, God appeared to Jacob at Bethel in a dream and gave Jacob the same covenant He gave to Abraham. Jacob believed God had chosen him as an heir of the promise—to follow God, to lead the family, and to teach the next generation to follow God too.

This meant Jacob would have a family. He arrived in Haran and saw Rachel, the daughter of Laban. Jacob loved Rachel. He agreed to work for seven years for Laban if Laban would let him marry Rachel. After seven years, Laban deceived Jacob. Instead of giving him Rachel, Laban gave him Rachel’s older sister, Leah.

Jacob was angry. Laban demanded that Jacob work another seven years if he wanted to marry Rachel. So Jacob worked seven more years. Jacob’s own plans for his life were not lining up with the Lord’s plans. He wanted to have children with Rachel, but she was barren. His first four sons came from Leah. Finally, Rachel had Joseph and Benjamin.

In time, Jacob fathered twelve sons—Reuben, Simeon, Levi, Judah, Dan, Naphtali, Gad, Asher, Issachar, Zebulun, Joseph, and Benjamin. This week, help your kids understand nothing could stop God’s plan for the family of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. Even though Jacob did not love Leah, God loved her and used her in His plan. Through the family of Jacob and Leah’s son Judah, God would show His love for the world by sending His Son to be the Savior He promised.

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

This week in Sunday Kids

Jacob and Esau

Unit 3: Session 1

Teaching on 11.11.2018

Jacob and Esau were rivals before birth. They struggled in the womb, and Jacob was born grabbing onto Esau’s heel. Even though he was younger, Jacob convinced Esau to sell him his birthright for some stew. When Isaac was old and blind, the time came for Isaac to bless Esau. With the blessing came the privilege afforded to the firstborn—leadership over the family. With Rebekah’s guidance, Jacob deceived his father and stole his brother’s blessing.

In his anger, Esau planned to kill Jacob. Rebekah sent Jacob away to her brother Laban until Esau calmed down. Isaac blessed Jacob before he left and told him to find a wife among his relatives.

Jacob had a 500-mile journey ahead of him. Along the way, he stopped and camped under the stars. He used a rock as a pillow and fell asleep. That night, Jacob dreamed and saw a stairway from the ground to the sky, and God’s angels were going up and down on it.

The Lord stood beside him and said, “I am the Lord, the God of your father Abraham and the God of Isaac” (Gen. 28:13). God promised to give Jacob’s family land and numerous descendants, and He promised they would be a blessing to all the nations of the earth. 

In the morning, Jacob set up the stone as a marker and poured oil on it He named the place Bethel, which means “House of God.” He vowed to follow God if God kept His promise to be with him and take care of him. Then Jacob continued on his journey.

As you share with your kids, remind them that Jacob was the child chosen by God to carry the family line—to follow God, to lead the family, and to teach the next generation to follow God too. The promises for Abraham and Isaac also became the promises for Jacob. At Bethel, God showed that His plan was to continue the covenant through Jacob’s family and eventually a whole nation, leading to the birth of Jesus—the promised Savior.

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

This week in Sunday Kids

God’s Promise to Isaac

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Unit 2: Session 4

Teaching on 11.04.2018

In His covenant with Abraham, God promised land, descendants, and a blessing to all the nations of the earth. (Gen. 22:17-18) God would keep His promise through every generation, choosing one person to carry the line until one day, a child would be born into the family who would be the promised One. God reaffirmed the promise to Abraham’s son Isaac. Isaac was the next child chosen to carry the family line.

After 20 years of marriage, Isaac and Rebekah still did not have children. Isaac prayed that God would give Rebekah a child, and God answered his prayer. Rebekah became pregnant with twins, but the pregnancy was difficult. The twins fought inside her, and Rebekah asked God, “Why is this happening to me?”

God explained His plan for the twins. The boys’ families would become two nations (from Esau, the nation of Edom; from Jacob, the nation of Israel), one stronger than the other. And the older son would serve the younger. This was uncommon; the firstborn had a birthright—a double portion of the inheritance. But this prophecy showed God had chosen the younger twin to inherit the promise made to Abraham.

Jacob and Rebekah’s boys were born and the older, Esau (EE saw), was unlike the younger, Jacob. Esau became a hunter, and Jacob stayed at home. One day, Esau agreed to give his birthright to Jacob in exchange for some bread and a bowl of stew.


Isaac may have perceived the conflict between brothers as a threat to the covenant. But God appeared to Isaac at Gerar reaffirmed His promise of land, descendants, and a blessing to all the nations of the earth. (Gen. 26:4) He encouraged Isaac to be faithful like Abraham. God was at work in each generation. He showed grace by extending the promise to those who had no innate right to it, to those who did not deserve it.

As you share this story with your kids, remind them that God’s covenant with Abraham continued to the next generation. Esau sold his birthright, giving Jacob the right to the wonderful blessings God promised to his father Abraham. Through Jacob’s family, God would send the promised Savior to bring blessing and salvation to the world.


Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

This week in Sunday School

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Isaac and Rebekah

Unit 2: Session 3

Teaching on 10.28.2018

After God tested Abraham, Abraham named the place “The LORD Will Provide” (Gen. 22:14) God repeated His promise to Abraham: “I will indeed bless you and make your offspring as numerous as the stars of the sky … And all the nations of the earth will be blessed by your offspring” (Gen. 22:17-18).

God blessed Abraham’s life, and he was about 140 years old when he asked his most trusted servant to go to his relatives and find a wife for his 40-year-old son Isaac. Abraham believed God would keep His promise; he trusted that God had a wife for Isaac and that Isaac would have a family because he was the child chosen by God to carry the family line—to follow God, to lead the family, and to teach the next generation to follow God too.

Abraham’s servant asked God for a clear sign of who should be Isaac’s wife. When Rebekah appeared and agreed to give water to the servant—and also, she offered, to his camels—the servant knew God was at work. He responded with worship: “Blessed be the LORD, the God of my master Abraham, who has not withheld his kindness and faithfulness from my master” (Gen. 24:27).

Rebekah introduced the servant to her family, including her brother Laban. The servant recounted the events, and everyone agreed the Lord had chosen Rebekah to be Isaac’s wife. She traveled with the servant hundreds of miles to Abraham’s house. When she saw Isaac, she covered herself with a veil. The servant told Isaac everything that had happened. Then Isaac married Rebekah, and he loved her.


As you talk with your kids about this story, emphasize that God provided Rebekah as a wife for Isaac as part of His covenant to bless the whole world through Abraham’s family. One day, Jesus would be born into Abraham’s family as the promised Savior.

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

This week in Sunday School

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Abraham and Isaac

Unit 2: Session 2

Teaching on 10.21.2018

This week, kids learn that God kept His promise to give Abraham and Sarah a son, and they named him Isaac. Isaac was the child chosen by God to carry the family line—to follow God, to lead the family, and to teach the next generation to follow God too. When Abraham was well over 100 years old, God tested Abraham. God instructed him to sacrifice Isaac on a mountain. How could this be? Abraham had waited so long for this child!

But Abraham obeyed. He got up early the next day and left on his trip. Instead of waiting around to see if God would change His mind, he saddled the donkey, took the wood, two servants, and his son, and left on the journey as God commanded.

As Isaac walked with his father, he noticed something was missing. They had the wood and the fire, but “Where is the lamb?” Isaac asked. Abraham answered that God Himself would provide. Abraham had supreme faith that God was able to do anything. Before going up the mountain, Abraham told the servants, “Stay here … we’ll come back” (Gen. 22:5). Hebrews 11:19 also gives us a peek inside Abraham’s mind: “He considered God to be able even to raise someone from the dead.”

God did provide. He provided a ram in place of Isaac, who was spared. After what we might imagine was quite a worship service, Abraham and Isaac returned home.

This week, help your kids understand that in the New Testament, God brings through John the Baptist the final answer to Isaac’s inquiry, “Where is the lamb?” “Here is the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world!” (John 1:29). Abraham showed his love for God by being willing to sacrifice his son Isaac. This is how God showed His love for us: He sent His Son, Jesus, to die on the cross so that we could have eternal life through Him. He was the sacrifice made in our place so we can live.

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.


This week in Sunday School

God’s Covenant With Abraham

Unit 2: Session 1

Teaching on 10/14/2018

Over the next few weeks of the Gospel Project for Kids, kids will learn that God was still working out His plan to send Jesus into the world to rescue us from sin. Since the beginning, God wanted to bless and provide for His people. Genesis 11 records the generations between Noah and Abram. Noah’s son Shem had a family. Through Shem’s line, God would keep His promise to send a Savior. Shem’s seventh-great grandson was named Abram. Abram was born in Ur of the Chaldeans.

Abram was in his homeland when God spoke to him. God told Abram: “Go out from your land, your relatives, and your father’s house to the land that I will show you. I will make you into a great nation, I will bless you, I will make your name great, and you will be a blessing. I will bless those who bless you, I will curse anyone who treats you with contempt, and all the peoples on earth will be blessed through you” (Gen. 12:1-3).

By faith, Abram obeyed God. He traveled toward the land of Canaan with his wife, Sarai; his father, Terah; and his nephew, Lot. They settled in Haran, about 600 miles from their home. When Abram was 75 years old, he left Haran with his wife, his nephew, and all their possessions.

Genesis 15 records the Abrahamic covenant. The word of the Lord came to Abram in a vision. God made a covenant with Abram and promised to give him offspring as numerous as the stars in the sky and to give his family the land of Canaan. At 99 years old, Abram was still childless. How would God keep His promise if Abram didn’t have any children? But God was serious about the covenant; He always keeps His promises. God even changed Abram’s name to Abraham, which means “Father of a Multitude.”


As you talk to your kids this week, help them discover God promised to bless all the world through Abraham. God sent Jesus from His home in heaven to be born on earth into Abraham’s family. Through Jesus, all the nations of the earth are blessed because Jesus saves people from their sins.

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

this week in sunday kids

The Suffering of Job

Unit 1: Session 6

10.07.2018

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Why would we hear the story of Job while studying stories from Genesis? Most biblical authorities believe, based on subject matter and language, that Job was a contemporary to the patriarchs. Job fits chronologically into this period in history.

Job was a wealthy man who loved God. At the beginning of the book, God allows Satan to test Job’s faithfulness. Job lost everything, and he asked God why these things were happening. God answered Job, and His response reveals that God alone is all-powerful, sovereign, and good.


“Have you ever in your life commanded the morning or assigned the dawn its place?” (Job 38:12). God has. He is all-powerful. “Does the eagle soar at your command?” (Job 39:27). It does at God’s. He is sovereign. “Who provides the raven’s food when its young cry out to God?” (Job 38:41). God provides. He is good.

Everyone suffers—those who follow God and those who don’t. While the Book of Job speaks volumes to the problem of human suffering, it is also an important picture of how a suffering person should relate to God. Job didn’t understand his suffering and he even doubted God, but Job’s suffering ultimately brought him closer to God. God is always in control, even when His people can’t see the reason behind the suffering God allows.

As you share with your kids this week, help them see that following Jesus is worth it. God is good, present, and in control. We can trust Him even when we don’t understand the pain we have to endure. At the cross, God used the ultimate pain to bring about the ultimate good: our future and final salvation from sin. 

Job learned that God is all-powerful, sovereign, and good. When we face suffering, we can hope in God. God sent Jesus, the only truly innocent One, to suffer and die so that everyone who trusts in Him can have forgiveness and eternal life.

This week in sunday kids

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The Tower of Babel

Unit 1: Session 5

Teaching on 9.30.2018

Following the flood, God commanded Noah in Genesis 9:1 to “Be fruitful and multiply and fill the earth.” This command echoes the one given to Adam and Eve in Genesis 1:28. God intended the paradise of the garden to spread into the whole world, but sinful people had other desires.

Genesis 10 accounts for the nations that spread out in the land after the flood (Gen. 10:32). The people moved east and settled in a valley. This story continues the cycle of distrust and disobedience to God. In Genesis 11:2, Scripture indicates that instead of filling the earth as God commanded, the people devised a plan to settle in one place and build a city and a large tower into the sky.

Read Genesis 11:4. The people’s motive was clear: “Let us make a name for ourselves.” The people didn’t want to be scattered. They didn’t believe God would give them what was good if they obeyed Him. They sought to obtain for themselves what they believed was good.

The people tried to build a monument with its top in the sky, but they succeeded only in separating themselves from God and from each other. God confused their language and scattered them over the earth. They were unable to finish building the city, so the city was called Babel—which sounds like the Hebrew word for “confused”—because there the Lord confused the people’s language.


As you share with your kids this week, help them see God’s better plan: His plan not for people to reach up to Him, but His plan to reach down to people by sending His Son, Jesus, to live the perfect life we couldn’t live and die the death we don’t want to die. Through Jesus, God brings together people of every tongue, tribe, and nation; we are all one in Christ. That is the gospel. Pray that your children would have open hearts to receive it.

People chose to give glory to themselves instead of God. They ignored God’s plan, so God confused their language and scattered the people all over the earth. One day, Jesus will gather together all of God’s people—people from every tribe and people who speak all kinds of languages—and they will worship Him together. (Revelation 7:9-10.

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

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Noah and the Ark

Unit 1: Session 4

9/23/2018

Adam and Eve left the garden to start a life out in the world. Despite the grief of their sins, imagine their joy as their family grew. With each birth, maybe Eve hoped this son would be the one to end the curse of sin, to crush the head of the snake. (Gen. 3:15) But Adam and Eve witnessed sin’s effects on their own children: Cain murdered Abel. Cain was not the Promised One, and neither was Abel.

Some time later, Eve gave birth to another son, Seth. Seth lived 912 years. He saw the earth’s population grow as God sustained generation after generation. Less than 20 years after his death, Seth’s sixth-great-grandson, Noah was born.

By this time—10 generations after Adam—people had stopped following God. Scripture describes a deplorable situation: “Human wickedness was widespread on the earth … every inclination of the human mind was nothing but evil all the time” (Gen. 6:5).

God decided to send a flood to cleanse the earth. He was right to punish this sin. The waters would cover the earth and destroy everything. God graciously chose to save one man and his family, so he warned Noah about the flood and told him to build an ark.

Noah believed God’s warning about the coming judgment. He obediently worked to build the ark. But the work took years, and Noah likely faced ridicule from his friends and neighbors. Was Noah crazy, building a boat where there was no water?

Finally, God’s judgment came. Floodwaters covered the earth. Every living thing was destroyed, but Noah and his family were safe inside the ark. God rescued Noah’s family—the family His own Son would be born into. God rescued Noah and his family from the flood. The story of Noah points ahead to a greater rescue. God’s Son, Jesus—the only perfectly righteous One—came to take the punishment for our sin. By trusting in Him, we are saved from the punishment our sin deserves. 

As you share this story with your kids, remind them that Jesus would warn of God’s coming judgment too, but instead of condemning the world, Jesus would give up His life to rescue sinners.

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

This week in Sunday Kids

Sin Entered the World

Unit 1: Session 3

Teaching on 9.16.2018

Last week, kids learned that God created people to live with Him in a perfect relationship forever. This week, kids learn that Adam and Eve enjoyed all that was good in the garden of Eden. The Lord gave them only one restriction: “You must not eat from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil,” and the punishment for disobeying was severe: “You will certainly die” (Gen. 2:17). 


Before the fall, Adam and Eve enjoyed a loving, two-way relationship with God. The garden was a true paradise. God filled the garden with good gifts so that they might enjoy them and give thanks to God. This glorifies God. All of that changed when Adam and Eve gave in to the serpent’s temptation. Eve believed the lie that leads many of us to sin: Maybe God is holding out on me.

Adam and Eve desired something more: the wisdom the fruit offered. But when their eyes were opened, they were aware of their nakedness and they felt ashamed. Surely the Lord’s heart broke at their act of disobedience and rebellion. Because of their sin, He cast them out of the garden. Though they did not die right away, sin’s effect was immediate and thorough. Their lives and their children’s lives—and the lives of all of mankind—would be forever affected by their choice.

God did not leave Adam and Eve without hope. He promised that one of Eve’s descendants would strike the head of the serpent. (Gen. 3:15) Each generation after Eve hoped that one of their children would be the promised One—the One who would crush the head of the snake and put an end to the curse over creation.

As you talk with your kids about this story, emphasize that ever since Adam and Eve sinned, all people have been sinners. Our sin separates us from God, but God still loves us. God promised a Rescuer would come from Eve’s family. God sent His Son, Jesus, to rescue people from sin and bring them back to God.

Sin is a big problem that needs a big solution. At just the right time, God sent His Son into the world, born as a baby. Matthew 1:21 says, “You are to name him Jesus, because he will save his people from their sins.” As the kids you teach become increasingly aware of the bad news—that we are all sinners from birth—rejoice with them over the good news: “Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners” (1 Tim. 1:15).

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week

This Week in Sunday Kids

God Created People

Unit 1: Session 2

Teaching on 9.9.2018

This week, kids learn that on the sixth day of creation, God created man in His own image. God formed the man out of dust from the ground and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life, and the man became a living creature. (Gen. 2:7) Man was set apart as different from the rest of God’s creation. God skillfully formed man out of dust as a potter forms a pot out of clay. (See Isa. 64:8.) He put His own breath into man.

God sustained and provided for the man. He planted a garden in Eden and put the man there to work it and keep it. (Gen. 2:8,15) Then God gave the man a command. God told the man, “You must not eat from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil.” Then God explained the consequences, “For on the day you eat from it, you will certainly die” (Gen. 2:17).

Then God made woman from the man’s rib. She was a suitable helper for him. Both man and woman were created in God’s image. The first man, Adam, and the first woman, Eve, lived in the garden and enjoyed God’s friendship.

This week, help your kids think about what it means to be made in the image of God. It means we are made like Him, or patterned after Him. God does not have a physical body; He is Spirit, and He has given each of us a spirit. God gives people the ability to think and to feel emotions and to make choices. He gives us the ability to understand right and wrong.

God created people in His own image and provides for everything He made. People are special because God made people to live forever in a relationship with Him. Through His Son, Jesus, we can have eternal life with God just as He planned. Out of His great love for the people He made, God sent His Son, Jesus—“the image of the invisible God” (Col. 1:15) and “the exact expression of his nature” (Heb. 1:3). God the Son became fully man, acting as the second Adam, to bring life to those who are in Him. (See 1 Cor. 15:45-49.)

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

This week in Sunday Kids

God Created Everything!

Unit 1- Session 1 

Teaching on 9.3.2018

In the beginning, God created everything. God created the universe ex nihilo, or “out of nothing.” All of creation began with a word. When God spoke, it happened: light, land, sky, stars, plants, and animals. God made them all, and they were good. Creation was perfect, just as God intended.

The first story—in fact, every story in the Bible—is a small piece of a much bigger story: God’s redemptive story. Sin would enter the world and affect everything, but God already knew. He already had a plan to show His grace to people through His Son (2 Tim. 1:9), to rescue and restore. 

The Bible says that God’s plan existed before He created the world. (Eph. 1:4-6) The Bible tells the story of how a great God redeemed rebellious people by sending His Son, Jesus, to be the perfect sacrifice for sin. 

The story of Jesus does not begin in a manger. Jesus is Lord over all of creation. The Son has always existed. The Bible says everything was created by Him and for Him, and He holds everything together. All of creation exists to bring God glory. Through creation, we see and understand God’s eternal power and divine nature. (Rom. 1:20)


As you talk to your kids this week, help them discover who God is. Remind boys and girls that God created everything with a purpose: to bring Him glory. Psalm 19:1 says, “The heavens declare the glory of God, and the expanse proclaims the work of his hands.” The Book of Genesis is the beginning of the greatest story ever told. It is a true story, and at the center of it all is the true hero: our Savior, Jesus Christ. This story changes everything.

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

This Week in Sunday Kids

Jesus Will Return

Unit 36:Session 4

Teaching on 08.26.2018

This week we’ll be studying the last chapters of the Bible. Our three year journey is almost over. While he was a prisoner on the island of Patmos, the apostle John had an amazing vision of heaven. Jesus told John to write down everything he saw. John saw things that will happen when Jesus comes back to earth.

John described a vision of heaven itself. He wrote about the beauty of the New City—the New Jerusalem. The streets will be pure gold, like clear glass. The foundations of the city wall will be adorned with precious stones. The city will not need the sun or the moon because God’s glory lights up the city. There will be no darkness, and nothing evil will ever come into the city. There will be no sadness, crying, or pain. Even though there will be no sun or moon, there will be no darkness because the glory of God will be its light. The Lord will reign forever and ever. What an amazing place heaven will be!

Even with John’s descriptions, we can’t imagine exactly what it will be like when Jesus returns. Use this session to emphasize what we do know, using the unit big picture question and answer: What will happen when Jesus returns? Jesus will destroy all evil and make all things new.

The promised return of Christ should fill believers with hope, strengthening them to persevere through the trials of this life and remain faithful to the Lord. When Christ returns, those who trust in Him will be with Him and enjoy Him forever. God will undo every bad thing caused by sin—no more death, no more pain, no more tears.

Christ’s return should also give believers a sense of urgency to share the gospel with the world. It is the power of God for salvation to everyone who believes! (Rom. 1:16) Jesus is coming soon. Amen. Come, Lord Jesus!

Jesus promised to come back to earth soon. When Jesus returns, those who trust in Jesus will be with Him and enjoy Him forever. God will undo every bad thing caused by sin—no more death, no more pain, no more tears. Jesus is making all things new.

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

this week in summer sunday kids

Jesus on the Throne

Unit 36: session 3

Teaching on 08.19.2018

John was on the island of Patmos when he had a vision. Jesus appeared to John and showed him what will happen before the end of time. John wrote about what he saw in the Book of Revelation. John saw a vision of the future. John saw a throne in heaven and the Lord was on the throne.

John saw a scroll in the Lord’s right hand. A mighty angel asked, “Who is worthy to open the scroll?” But no one in heaven was worthy. No one on earth was worthy. No one under the earth was worthy either. 

John began to cry loudly because no one was worthy! Then John saw Jesus, the resurrected Lamb. The elders threw their crowns at His feet. They worshiped Him and sang a new song. John heard every creature, everywhere, worshiping the Lamb together.

Revelation 4:11 says, “Our Lord and God, you are worthy to receive glory and honor and power, because you have created all things, and by your will they exist and were created.”

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John’s vision gives us a glimpse of our future and also reminds us of a present reality: The Lord is on His throne. After His death and resurrection, Jesus ascended to heaven and sat down at the right hand of God. (Heb. 10:12)

Jesus, the Lamb of God, is worthy of our praise. All the creatures in John’s vision worshiped Jesus. As you read this Bible story with your kids, hold up Jesus as our treasure who is worthy of all honor. Worship Him together in song.

John cried when he saw that no one was worthy to open the scroll. Then John saw the resurrected Lamb—God’s Son, Jesus. Jesus was killed on the cross so that we could have forgiveness and eternal life. Jesus is worthy. He deserves all praise, honor, and blessing.

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

FAMILY STARTING POINTS 

Babies and Toddlers

  • ○ Jesus will come back.
  • ○ John saw God’s throne in heaven.
  • ○ All of heaven will praise Jesus forever and ever.
  • ○ People from every nation will praise Jesus forever. 

Preschool

  • ○ What will happen when Jesus comes back? Jesus will make all things new.
  • ○ Everyone and everything will worship Jesus.

 Kids

  • ○ What will happen when Jesus returns? Jesus will destroy all evil and make all things new. 
  • ○ All people and all creatures in heaven and on earth will worship Jesus.

 

This week in Summer Sunday Kids

God's warning to seven Churches

Unit 36: Session 3

Teaching on 08.12.2018

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The Book of Revelation opens with John’s description of a vision. In the vision, Jesus gave John messages for seven local churches. Jesus told John to write these messages on a scroll and send them to the churches.

In most cases, Jesus commended the church for their good work, warned them about the areas in which they needed correction, and urged them to return to Him. Among other things, He warned the churches not to forget their love of the Lord. He encouraged them not to be afraid of being tested. He urged those who were surrounded by evil to not deny their faith. Each time, Jesus promised to reward those who remain faithful to Him.

The church is made up of people who have trusted in Jesus, who are committed to one another, and who meet together to worship Jesus and share the gospel. Jesus loves the church as His bride. (See Eph. 5:25-27; Rev. 19:7-9.) Jesus’ message called the churches to turn away from their sin and remain faithful to Him. The Lord is slow to anger (Ex. 34-6-7) and patient, wanting everyone to repent (2 Pet. 3:9).

Jesus warned specific churches in Asia Minor (modern-day Turkey), but the problems they faced can still be found in churches today. Help kids understand some of the problems the early churches faced: They did not love like they should, they believed false teaching and did wrong things, and they were lukewarm—useless to the cause of Christ. 

Help your children understand that we can pray for our churches to be faithful, effective instruments in spreading the gospel. We should love the church because Jesus loves the church. Through the church, Jesus helps believers work together to do God’s plan. Finally, Jesus warned believers to stay alert because He will come like a thief when no one is expecting Him. Believers—then and now—must always be ready!

Jesus loves the church. His message to seven local churches called them to turn away from their sin and remain faithful to Him. We can learn from those churches. Through the church, Jesus helps believers work together to do God’s plan.

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

This week in Summer Sunday School

John's Vision of Jesus

Unit 26: Session 1

Teaching on 8.5.2018

During this unit, we will be looking at God’s message about what will happen when Jesus returns in the Book of Revelation. The apostle John wrote the Book of Revelation from the island of Patmos. Patmos was a small Greek island where the Roman emperor often exiled prisoners. John was likely sent to Patmos as a prisoner, arrested for preaching the gospel.

With this Bible story, introduce your kids to the Book of Revelation—the last book of the Bible. Other Bible books tell us about things that happened in past, but Revelation tells about things that will happen in the future. A glimpse of the future kingdom of God gives believers hope and encourages them to remain faithful to Christ.

In Revelation 1, Jesus appeared to John in a vision to tell about the end of time. John was on the island of Patmos when he heard a voice telling him to write what he saw. John turned and, in a vision, saw Jesus: He was wearing a long robe with a gold sash wrapped around His chest. His head and hair were as white as snow, and His eyes were like a fiery flame. Because the Book of Revelation is highly symbolic, avoid dwelling on the physical description of Jesus. Jesus’ appearance to John reveals what Jesus is like: worthy of all honor, powerful, and victorious. 

John saw Jesus walking among seven lampstands, symbols for the seven churches. Explain to the boys and girls you teach that lampstands are used to bring light into dark places. That is the purpose of the church—to bring the light of the gospel into a dark world.

When John saw Jesus, he fell at Jesus’ feet. Jesus reached down and put His hand on John. He said, “Don’t be afraid” (Rev. 1:17). Jesus showed Himself to John and explained that He is the First and the Last, the Living One. While Jesus was on earth, He defeated sin and death by dying on the cross and coming back to life. Now Jesus is lifted up in glory and honor forever and ever. We can look forward to a future with Him forever.

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

 

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This week in summer sunday kids

While we wait

Unit 35: Session 4

Teaching on 7.29.2018

Peter’s story of faith began when Jesus said, “Follow Me.” (Matt. 4:18) Peter and his brother Andrew—two fishermen from Galilee—left their nets and followed Jesus. As one of Jesus’ twelve disciples, Peter witnessed firsthand Jesus’ miracles and teachings. He saw Jesus heal his mother-in-law (Matt. 8:14) and raise a little girl from the dead (Luke 8:49-55). He saw Jesus walk on water, and Peter walked on water too. (Matt. 14:25-29)

Peter believed that Jesus is the Messiah (Matt. 16:16), and he was understandably upset when Jesus predicted that Peter would deny Him (Matt. 26:34-35). Peter fell asleep as Jesus prayed in the garden, and he drew his sword to defend Jesus when He was arrested. (Matt. 26:40; John 18:10) Peter denied Jesus three times, but after the resurrection Jesus appeared to Peter and the other disciples. Then Jesus restored Peter to ministry at the sea of Galilee. (John 21:15-19)

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The first 12 chapters in the Book of Acts record the Holy Spirit’s work through Peter after Pentecost. God revealed to Peter that the gospel is for everyone—Jews and Gentiles. Peter was arrested and imprisoned for sharing the gospel, but an angel of the Lord rescued him. (Acts 12:1-8)

When Peter wrote his second letter, he was in prison again. Peter was aware that death was imminent. (2 Pet. 1:13-15) Like Jude, Peter warned against false teachers. Soon after his letter was written, Peter was killed in Rome as Jesus had predicted. (John 21:18-19) 

Some people thought the believers were foolish for thinking Jesus is coming again. Peter explained that God is patient, and He wants everyone to trust in Jesus. At just the right time, Jesus will come again, and we look forward to the day when He creates the new heavens and a new earth. 

As you talk about this Bible story with your kids, remind them that Peter’s letter was written nearly two thousand years ago to believers who were not far removed from Jesus’ life on earth. Today, we still wait eagerly for Jesus’ return, and God calls us to use our time on earth as an opportunity to better know and love Him, and to tell others about Him 

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

This week in Summer Sunday Kids

Remeber God's Truth

Unit 35: Session 3

Teaching on 7.22.2018

Jude, along with James, was a younger half-brother of Jesus. And like James, it wasn’t until Jesus rose from the dead that Jude believed Jesus was the Son of God. Sometime between AD 65 and AD 80, Jude wrote a short letter to warn believers about false teachers. False teachers had secretly made their way into the church, and Jude urged his readers not to abandon their beliefs but to “contend for the faith” (Jude 3). 

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Jude wanted them to not only defend the true teachings but also to actively share the gospel. He told his friends to show mercy to those who doubt, to lead others to Jesus, and to hate sin.

There are still false teachers today, and some of them still try to sneak into the church itself. Remind your children that God loves us, and He warns us through Scripture to be on guard. We can study His Word to know what is true, and we can rely on the Holy Spirit for wisdom and discernment.

Such a strong warning about false teachers might be reason for panic among believers, but Jude ended his letter reminding them of God’s promise. Ultimately, Jesus is the One who protects His people from sin. Throughout history, God has been working out His plan to bring a people to Himself. God will keep us, and He calls us to not only remember His truth but to encourage other believers to defend the faith.

As you talk with your kids about this story, emphasize that Jude warned the early Christians that some people would try to divide them by sinning and by teaching things that weren’t true. Jesus is the way, the truth, and the life—the One who protects His people from sin. Because of Jesus, we will be able to stand before God with joy.

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

This week in Summer Sunday School

Paul Gave Hope

Unit 35- Session 2

Teaching on 7.15.2018

Consider how your life would change if you could know the future—if you could accurately predict the weather or outcomes of baseball game. If you could know how your life is going to turn out, would you live today differently? In the bigger picture of God’s plan for the world, we do know the future. God reveals the outcome of His plan for humanity in His Word. 

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In the Book of 1 Thessalonians, Paul writes about the future to encourage believers facing persecution. Their hope as believers then is the same as our hope as believers today. We look forward to a final resurrection, the return of Jesus, and the judgment of the world.

Around AD 50, the city of Thessalonica was filled with those who worshiped idols, Greek and Roman gods, and even the Roman emperor himself. So when Paul started a church there, he quickly faced persecution and was forced to flee the city. Even though he could not return, Paul still loved the young church and was concerned for them, so he sent Timothy to check on the believers.

Timothy reported back with good news—though the church was suffering from persecution, they were holding tightly to their faith. They did have some misunderstandings about Christianity, especially the return of Jesus, but they were working hard for the Lord. Paul wrote a letter to encourage the believers and to clear up misunderstandings about the future and what happens when Christians die.

Perhaps Paul’s greatest message was about the return of Jesus. The prophets in the Old Testament told about the Day of the Lord, a day when God would come to judge the world and save His people. Paul said that in the future, on the Day of the Lord, Jesus will return for His people and judge the wicked. Believers live with hope, knowing that Jesus will come again. That’s a promise we can still claim today.

Paul’s letter gave believers hope. Help your kids understand this week that the hope we find in the Bible is stronger than just wanting something to happen; biblical hope is expecting with confidence because we know God is faithful and true.

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

this week in summer sunday kids

Paul's Letter to the Ephesians 

Unit 35- Session 1

Teaching on 7.8.2018

During this unit, we will be looking at how God gave hope to Christians while they waited for Jesus’ return. Paul was a prisoner under house arrest in Rome when a man named Onesimus (oh NESS ih muhs) came to visit him. Onesimus was a slave who had run away from a wealthy man named Philemon. As it turned out, Paul was a friend of Philemon. So when Paul told Onesimus the good news about Jesus and Onesimus believed, Paul desired forgiveness and reconciliation between Onesimus and Philemon—now brothers in Christ.

So Paul wrote a letter and told Onesimus to take it to Philemon. The Book of Philemon is the letter written by Paul to Philemon. Though Onesimus had become dear to him and Paul wanted Onesimus to stay with him in Rome, Paul sent him back to Philemon with his letter.

In the letter, Paul urged Philemon to forgive Onesimus and treat him as a fellow brother in Christ. Paul even offered to pay Onesimus’s debt for him. Though Paul could have used his authority as an apostle of Christ to force Philemon to do what he wanted, Paul instead appealed to him as a friend and a fellow believer. He urged Philemon to treat Onesimus as if he were Paul himself—with love and kindness.

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Paul offered to pay Onesimus’s debt to make peace between him and Philemon. In this way, Paul acted like Jesus, who makes peace between God and man. Jesus took the punishment we deserve for our sin. He paid our debt so that we can be forgiven and welcomed by God as brothers and sisters of Jesus. (See Heb. 2:11.)

Paul’s letter serves as a reminder to us that everyone is equal before Jesus. People from completely different backgrounds—like Paul, a former Jewish leader; Onesimus, a runaway slave; and Philemon, a Gentile slave-owner—are brought together by the gospel under the lordship of Jesus Christ. In light of God’s love for us, remind your kids this week that we can be loving, kind, and forgiving to our brothers and sisters in Christ for the glory of God.

Check this session’s Activity Page and Big Picture Card as well as the Gospel Project for Kids Family App for ways to interact with the Bible content this week.

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