Great Are You Lord

Stories are powerful. They inspire us to hope, to dream, to love, to fear, to sorrow, and even to action. But consider this – the words that we sing on Sunday mornings here at Woodlands place us right in the thick of the greatest story every told…it’s the story of God’s working in the world to redeem a people for himself (the church) and make all things new.

This story, for human beings, starts in Genesis 2:7 when “God formed the man of dust from the ground and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life, and the man became a living creature.” God is the source of all life, and especially the source of life for the crown of his creation, the only created beings who bear his image and have his very breath in their lungs.

Yet, those image bearers of God still possess a will of their own that chose to go their own way and disobey the only commandment that was given to them. This sin results in an immediate decimation of the goodness that God had poured into his creation; it even results in a man taking the breath of life out of the lungs of his own brother (Genesis 4).

We have a choice as to how we will use the breath of life that God has given us. Psalm 1 is a beautiful and foreboding contrast of the two choices that we have – we either use the breath in our lungs for the Lord or we don’t, there is no middle ground nor is there a spectrum.

Sunday mornings are where we play our part in the story of God’s people. This Sunday we’ll be singing “Great Are You Lord”  by All Sons and Daughters, the chorus of which says:

“It’s your breath in our lungs, so we pour out our praise to you only.”

When we gather as the people of God and sing these words, we are faithfully choosing to act in surrender and give our very breath back to God who gave it to us. In doing so, we carry the torch handed to us by the many followers of Christ who have gone before us.

We know the end point of the story that God is telling in the world, that he will indeed make all things new when Christ returns. But in the mean time, there is a part of this story that is left untold as we are the ones charged with writing it.

We encourage you this Sunday to take that breath that was given to you by God and faithfully continue the story that you’re a part of as you sing.

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Exalted Over All

The word "exalted" means to be raised to a position of high power or status.

Philippians 2, in one of the most beautiful passages of scripture, articulates Christ's incarnation, his death, his resurrection, and his exultation. Listen to what it says -

"...Christ Jesus, who, though he was in the form of God, did not count equality with God a thing to be grasped, but emptied himself, by taking the form of a servant, being born in the likeness of men. And being found in human form, he humbled himself by becoming obedient to the point of death, even death on a cross. Therefore God has highly exalted him and bestowed on him the name that is above every name, so that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, in heaven and on earth and under the earth, and every tongue confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father."

This passage grasps the essence of the gospel. The songs we will sing in eternity will be songs celebrating, declaring, and shouting from the depth of our lungs that Christ is the exulted King. That his death and resurrection brought victory. 

This song, Exalted Over All, uses such language. The chorus says,

"One Name is higher, One name is stronger, than any grave, than any throne, Christ exalted over all."

Oh what a victorious reality. We serve the reigning and ruling savior of the world. May our joy be found in declaring his greatness. May our hope rest in the reality that our God is greater than any fear, any doubt, any pain. May our eyes be fixed on and hearts never waver from Christ.

"We sing your praise. We sing your praise. We sing your praise forever.

We lift your name. We lift your name. JESUS OVER ALL."

 

 

 

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Light Shine In

The concept of 'light' is one that we hear often throughout scripture.

Christ called himself 'the light of the world. -

"When Jesus spoke again to the people, he said, 'I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will never walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.'"

God promised through the prophet Isaiah that light would come -

“Arise, shine; for your light has come, And the glory of the LORD has risen upon you."

Paul uses the language of light in 2 Corinthians, saying that 'light' has enabled us to see and understand God's glory in Christ -

"For God, who said, 'Let light shine out of darkness, made his light shine in our hearts to give us the light of the knowledge of God’s glory displayed in the face of Christ."

To really appreciate the language of light, we must concede to the reality of darkness. One of my favorite musicians, Ryan O'Neal, says in one of his songs - "darkness exists to make light truly count."

Light matters because apart from God's enlightening work in our hearts, we will be stuck in darkness. The Prophet Isaiah says it so well -

"The people walking in darkness have seen a great light; on those living in the land of deep darkness a light has dawned."

Often times as we talk about realities of God, we forget that we would not even understand those realities had God not, in his grace, shone his light on our hearts. We cannot in and of ourselves understand who God is; It is a supernatural work of the Holy Spirit that enlightens our hearts to the truths of scripture. Light brings understanding. 'Light' also brings hope, because we are, in our nature, walking in darkness. Christ calls himself the 'light of the world' because only through him can we see the hope of the Gospel, for he is the hope.

This Sunday, we'll be singing the song "Light Shine In". Look at how this song begins -

"Arise, for the Light has come
Darkness bows down
To the risen Son, the risen Son
Arise, raise your hands and sing
To the one God"

I am hopeful as I read those words, because though darkness exists, darkness does not win. But I am also hopeful as I read those words because I know the risen Son. I have put my faith and trust in Jesus, and that was not of my own doing, that was because in God's grace he chose to enlighten my heart to sin and to my need for a savior.

So when the sun peaks through the window each morning, and light beams through the clouds, pause for a second; remind yourself of this - You (me), who were walking in darkness, have seen a great light. God in his abundant mercy made his light shine into your hearts that you could see and understand Him. Never take that for granted. And then sing these words at the top of your lungs, with gratitude in your hearts -

"Arise, for the light has come."

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God With Us

This Week we’ll be singing a new song called “God With Us.”

These three words are three of the most important words in all of history.

What does it mean that God is with us?

It means God entered into the messiness of life. God did not choose to stand at arms length and be distant. He entered in. He engaged in the brokenness of our life. He was born in a barn where farm animals lived (talk about messy). He was born into an incredibly messy family situation. A virgin with Child? Mary was no doubt ostracized by her family. His birth was pronounced to shepherds, who were nomads and homeless.

Christ’s entrance into our world was not clean and simply. It was messy.

And that’s good news.

Because life is messy, isn’t it? Life isn’t simple. Our lives are not perfect. Our families are not perfect. I don’t have to tell you that, satan reminds us of our failures constantly.

Condemnation is one of satan’s favorite tools. You’re a quitter, you’re a cheater, you’re a liar, you’re too fat, too slow, too ugly, not good enough, a failure. The list goes on. He is an accuser. 

But satan doesn’t tell us the whole story. What he doesn’t tell you is that the God of the universe is, as Max Lucado puts it, “a God who stoops."

Christ is our advocate. Remember the story in the Bible of the woman caught in adultery? If not, go read it. It’s found in John chapter 8. She was caught in her sin. She was guilty. She was condemned by everyone, except one. Who didn’t condemn her? Christ. Instead, he entered into the messiness. He stooped down to the woman’s level and wrote in the dust.

Christ then told the accusers, “let him who is without sin cast the first stone.” One by one they all left until it was just the woman and Christ. His words to her are beautiful;

“woman, where are your accusers? Has no one condemned you?”

No one. He then says, “Then neither do I condemn you. Go now and leave your life of sin.”

Christ stopped to her level and gave her grace. He entered into her world and called her to new life.

Christ willingly entered into the messiness of our world. Hear that again - He wanted to. He did not look at our lives and stand at a distance. He said, “yes, I want him. I want her.”

So much so that I will stoop to their level; because they’re worth it. Because YOU are worth it.

God With Us. That’s hopeful.

Let these words and their implications resonate in your souls this Christmas season.

 

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Come, Thou Long Expected Jesus

As we begin Advent this Sunday, Nov 27, we take time to slow down and foster a sense of longing, anticipating the coming of the Savior.

These 4 weeks leading to Christmas are a great opportunity to remember that for centuries God’s people had looked forward with longing and anticipation to the Messiah.  Indeed, ever since the promise of a Savior in Eden, (Genesis 3) God’s people had long for, had searched for the One who fix the rift between humans and God, Who would atone for sins once and for all, and Who would reign over all.

It’s also a great time to long for the return of our Savior to culminate the plan of God and to bring to pass all the remaining promises of God – that there will be no more pain or sorrow or grief or tears or sin – that joy and peace will abound, that the healing of the nations will be a reality - and that God will dwell among His people.

One of the great songs that captures this so well is Charles Wesley’s “Come Thou Long Expected Jesus”.  Often hymnals only include 2 of the original 4 verses – but all are powerful.  Give a listen to them all in the video.
~ Pastor Doug Allord

More on how Wesley wrote the song after the video below.

    "After reading these words [Haggai 2:7], Wesley began to consider what Jesus' birth meant to the world's people. The minister lived in a time when many were suffering in hunger and poverty. There were orphans all around him. The distinction between the classes was distinct and large. He also knew a world in which slavery was allowed. It seemed that in the more than 1,700 years since the Lord had come, humanity had improved little, if at all.
      As Wesley considered the plight of so many in the world and then thought of Jesus' birth, then him, a hopeful thought consumed him. With great anticipation he found himself looking forward toward the second coming of Christ, desiring to see that with much zeal as the writer of Haggai had looked forward to the Lord's birth. And like the man who wrote down those words in the Old Testament, Wesley realized he would have to be patient. God's timing would take precedence over man's desires.
     As he thought of what the birth meant in the eyes of those looking forward to it, Wesley began to jot down the lines of "Come, Thou Long-Expected Jesus." Much more than a babe in the manger, the Jesus Charles wrote about was the adult king who came to set people free. He was the fulfilling of prophecy and the answer to the problems not only of every man, woman, and child, but of each of the earth's nations. Though Wesley's lyrics acknowledged and emphasized the mighty power of God, his words also embraced the loving nature of Jesus. While it was the power that would deliver the world from sin, it was God's love that would ultimately change us into being more like Jesus. When he finished "Come, Thou Long-Expected Jesus," Wesley had perfectly married power and love."

- from More Stories Behind the Best-Loved Songs of Christmas by Ace Collins
copyright 2006 by Andrew Collins.  Published by Zondervan, Grand Rapids , MI

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I Will Follow

The song “I will follow” is a great declaration for us as a Christian. This song is a beautiful picture of the Christian life. It walks through different circumstances that tend to be realities in our lives;

“When the sea is calm and all is right..”
“When I see the wicked prospering...”
“When the boat is tossed upon the waves...”
“When I feel myself so far from home…”
“When I come to end this race I’ve run…”

What a realistic picture of life. Life is sticky, it’s complex, it’s challenging, and it’s beautiful. We will all have seasons of life where we may feel the overwhelming goodness of God. We also may have moments where He feels absent. 

One of my favorite Psalms is Psalm 77. In this Psalm the writer depicts in brutal honesty his frustrations and doubt. He asks genuine questions that perhaps sometimes as Christians we are afraid to express -

“Has his unfailing love vanished forever? Has his promise failed for all time?”

Wow! Talk about honesty. That honesty is so necessary in the Christian walk, but the expression of those doubts and feelings isn’t the goal. In Galatians 2:20 Paul says that we are to live by faith and not by sight. Our lives are to be lived for God’s glory and according to his word. Even if the realities of life don’t make sense to us or are painful, we aren’t called to see God by how we interpret our circumstances, but rather we are to live our lives and interpret circumstances based on how God has revealed himself in his word.

This is where the Psalmist ends up. Hear his words -

“Then I thought, ‘To this I will appeal:
the years when the Most High stretched out his right hand.
I will remember the deeds of the Lord;
yes, I will remember your miracles long ago. 
I will consider all your works
and meditate on all your mighty deeds.’"

As Christians, we need to acknowledge the times in life that are painful, trying, dry, and doubt-inducing. They exist. That’s ok. In those moments we need to not pretend like they don’t exist, but rather in the midst of them, make an intentional choice to live life based on who God is and how he has revealed himself. We need to remember God’s faithfulness, his promises, his power, his character, his presence, and his provision. When we set our lives on those things we can, by his spirit, chose to live and believe rightly while also being honest with our emotions.

So as we sing “I will follow”, let it be a reflection of your heart. Let yourself be honest about your current circumstances, whatever they may be, but then sing by faith this declaration -

“I believe everything that you say you are. 
I believe and I have seen your unchanging heart
in the good things, and in the hardest part
I believe and I will follow you."

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God of Justice

I’m super excited for church this weekend as this week we’re diving into the first part of a new 4-week series titled “Sent.” For this series we felt that we needed a song that would really be an anthem to what we’re about as followers of Christ here at Woodlands Church. God of Justice is that song.

The chorus says this:

We must go

Live to feed the hungry

Stand beside the broken

We must go

Stepping forward

Keep us from just singing

Move us into action

We must go

While many of our songs are sung “vertically” (from us to God), this is a song that I would say is “diagonal” in nature; we sing this both to the Lord and to/over ourselves. The words are nothing new, however, as they echo one of the most important parts of the heart of God as we understand Him.

“Justice” is a concept that is all over Scripture, both Old and New Testaments, whether directly stated or in concept. Take Micah 6:8 for example (perhaps you’ve heard this one before):

He has told you, O man, what is good; and what does the Lord require of you but to do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God?

There are whole books of the Bible dedicated to the concept of “justice.” The book of Leviticus documents the temple sacrificial system in which God’s justice plays an absolutely necessary role, whether directly stated or not. For a more exact example, almost the whole of God’s accusation against Israel revolves around their inability to do justice. Take a look at Amos 5:10-15 if you’re looking for some interesting side reading.

Perhaps most powerfully we see the fullness of how integral justice is to the heart of God in Matthew 23 as Jesus rebukes the injustice and corruption of the Jewish temple practices (read the whole chapter for a taste). Verse 23 highlights this rebuke:

Woe to you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! For you tithe mint and dill and cumin, and have neglected the weightier matters of the law: Justice, mercy, and faithfulness.”

Need I say more? Justice is indeed part of who God is! As members of His body – the church (Paul says that the church and Christ’s body are one in the same) – justice is to be an integral part of who we are and what we do.

The songs that we sing on Sunday mornings are true of God and true of ourselves. God of Justice is a song that acts as a driving mission and a prayer. It is a unifying anthem that drives us to “do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God (Mic. 6:8)”

As we sing this song on Sunday – and during the rest of the “Sent” series and beyond – be reminded that Jesus has called us to be bringers of redemption to a broken world around us –advocate for those who are victims of injustice and seek to bring justice to a corrupt and unjust world in the name of the only just God.

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Resurrecting

This week we’ll be singing what is one of my (Steve) favorite songs - Resurrecting. I love this song because of how powerfully it interacts with my every day life. If you’re like me, each week brings with it an amalgam of joys, stresses, trials, etc. This song reminds of my where my hope to make it through every day in a way that honors God comes from. Here’s what Romans 8:11 says - 

"The Spirit of God, who raised Jesus from the dead, lives in you. And just as God raised Christ Jesus from the dead, he will give life to your mortal bodies by this same Spirit living within you."

Take time to pause, slow down, and think about that. I don’t know what major obstacle or challenge is facing you. Maybe it’s physical, maybe it’s relational, maybe it’s emotional, maybe it’s financial, or maybe it’s spiritual.

What I do know is that the power that raised Jesus from the dead lives inside of you and will enable you to live the life he’s called you to. Having this resurrecting power inside of you doesn’t mean that every wound will be healed this side of heaven, every relationship will be fixed, or every tension resolved. It does mean, however, that as you battle sin every day you have the power that raised Jesus from the dead living in you to aid you and give you hope and new life. That is a personal hope for you.

But there’s also a corporate hope for us. Christ does not give us new life simply for our own purposes. We are given new life so that we can be a community of people built more and more into his image to offer hope to a world that needs resurrection power desperately (Ephesians 2:17-22). 

That’s hopeful. That’s something to celebrate. 

Brothers and Sisters - meditate on theses words and then sing them loud to God and over one another this Sunday -

“By your spirit I will rise from the ashes of defeat.
 The resurrected king is resurrecting me!
In your name I come alive, to declare your victory!
The resurrected king is resurrecting me!"
 

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Lamb of God

from Pastor Steve Berg

As a dad, one of my favorite things is entertaining the questions of my son. He is incredibly inquisitive and sometimes asks some really important questions. A little while ago he asked the question, “why did Jesus have to die?"

I paused. 

How can I explain this to a four year old? I want to just tell him it’s because God loves him, but that’s an incomplete picture. To rightly explain to my son why Jesus had to die I have to tell him it’s because he has sinned. That he is imperfect. It’s because me, his dad, has sinned and is imperfect. I did my best, and we actually had a good conversation about it (before he started talking about his race cars).

However, that question got me thinking. Christ died because he loves me. That is so fundamentally important and true. But Christ’s death doesn’t just point to the love of God, it points to the gravity of my sin. Sin is a big deal. It’s not something that God could just turn away from. Sin is so egregious that death is it’s penalty. 

Think about the justice system for a second; it’s only the worst of the worst crimes that carry the penalty of death. Sin carries just that. What is more shocking is that every single one of us deserves that. 

God in the Old Testament set up a regular practice of sacrificing a lamb to pay for peoples sins. Death had to happen because of our sin. But this sacrifice happened again and again, because it wasn’t the perfect sacrifice. 

And then Christ came. He lived a perfect life. He did not deserve to die because he did not sin. Yet he died. Hear these beautiful words from Hebrews 10 -

"And by the will of God, we have been made holy through the sacrifice of the body of Jesus Christ once for all.

Day after day every priest stands and performs his religious duties; again and again he offers the same sacrifices, which can never take away sins. But when this priest had offered for all time one sacrifice for sins, he sat down at the right hand of God, and since that time he waits for his enemies to be made his footstool. For by one sacrifice he has made perfect forever those who are being made holy."Christ is the perfect sacrifice for sin. That is why in heaven, one of the songs being sung is “worthy is the lamb who was slain."

So hear the words of the song Lamb of God:

“The Lamb of God, in my place
Your blood poured out, my sin erased
It was my death you died, I am raised to life
Hallelujah, the Lamb of God."

When we sing that, be reminded of the gravity of our sin, and be transformed by the weight of God’s love. 

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Lord, I Need You

from Pastor Doug Allord

One of the songs in our services this weekend combines both a fresh expression of dependence on Christ, yet also finds some of it's roots in the wonderful hymn, "I Need Thee Every Hour" by Annie Sherwood Hawks & Robert Lowry.

Matt Maher, the author of "Lord I Need You" cites the following quote from C.S. Lewis as some of his inspiration in crafting the song:

“Man’s love for God must always be very largely, and must often be entirely, a Need-love. This is obvious where we implore forgiveness for our sins or support in our tribulations...But in the long run it is perhaps even more apparent in our growing – for it ought to be growing – awareness that our whole being by its very nature is one vast need; incomplete, preparatory, empty yet cluttered, crying out for Him who can untie things that are now knotted together and tie up things that are still dangling loose.”

Lewis reminds us that it is not a need for self esteem, a need to feel loved, a need to feel significant, or a need for excitement in our lives. He’s referring to our need for forgiveness of our sins and a need for support in our tribulations.

We come, bowing in humility and need before our King's throne - confessing His goodness in spite of our broken-ness, and recognizing our only hope of forgiveness from sin and our strength when facing temptation is Jesus. Jesus alone.  Jesus is our one defense and Jesus is our righteousness. (2 Cor. 5:21)

The Scriptures remind us that each day, and every breath we have are gifts from God.  We're told that the entire universe is sustained by God's mighty power (Col 1:17, Heb 1:3) , so we can come confidently in our dependence knowing that He not only is able to help, but that He will act for our good and His glory.

As we gather to worship we're declaring that we exalt Christ and praise Him for being the answer to every daily, hourly and moment-by-moment need. Every area of our lives are in need of wholeness and healing and only Christ can save, heal, and restore.  

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One Thing Remains

from Pastor Matt Wilhelm

One of the songs that we’ll be singing together this Sunday is One Thing Remains; this song hits my heart on so many levels! The bridge goes like this:

"In death, in life, I’m confident and covered by
The power of Your great love
My debt is paid, there’s nothing that can separate
My heart from Your great love"

It reminds me so vividly of the Apostle Paul’s words from Romans 8:35-39:

Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or sword? … No, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him who loved us. For I am sure that neither death nor life, nor angels nor rulers, nor things present nor things to come, nor powers, nor height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God in Christ our Lord.

These incredibly powerful words close out a portion of Paul’s letter to the Romans that describes God’s restorative work in the lives of those who follow Him; a restorative work that culminates in each individual in God’s family being “conformed to the image of his Son (Rom. 8:29).”

When we sing these truths on Sunday, we don’t simply sing them because they’re inspiring. No, first and foremost we sing them because they’re true of who God is. The love of God is so entirely unlike the way that we love. If we’re honest, we tend to love with strings attached, expecting something in return for our sacrifice and efforts. But God loves us with the complete knowledge that we are fickle beings; he loves us despite who we are when we come to him asking for grace, and we can be confident that this grace covers us when we are faithless. God is faithful when we are faithless.

Because God is never changing and faithful to love when we don’t, we can sing these truths over one another as well. Make no mistake, if you have called upon Jesus as your savior and the Lord and leader of your life, your status as loved and redeemed is decided once and for all by a God who never goes back on his decisions.

It is so easy to allow our circumstances to determine what we think about God and think about ourselves. This song always reminds me that my walk with Christ is not about me, my goodness, my works, or my ability to love, but instead about Christ, his goodness, his righteousness manifested in me, and his ability to love without relent.

No matter who you are, where you’re coming from, or what you’ve done, remember that the love and work of Jesus is stronger than your sin. You are covered by the relentless and perfect love of God. More than that, though sin has distorted the image of God in you, the love of God is restoring you to the image of Jesus that you might join him in bringing that restoration to the world around you.

God loves you and in his love you have new purpose, new life, and a new nature. Let’s sing this over one another, singing an unchanging truth that’s founded in an unchanging God.

One of the songs that we’ll be singing together this Sunday is One Thing Remains; this song hits my heart on so many levels! The bridge goes like this:

In death, in life, I’m confident and covered by
The power of Your great love
My debt is paid, there’s nothing that can separate
My heart from Your great love

It reminds me so vividly of the Apostle Paul’s words from Romans 8:35-39:

Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or sword? … No, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him who loved us. For I am sure that neither death nor life, nor angels nor rulers, nor things present nor things to come, nor powers, nor height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God in Christ our Lord.

These incredibly powerful words close out a portion of Paul’s letter to the Romans that describes God’s restorative work in the lives of those who follow Him; a restorative work that culminates in each individual in God’s family being “conformed to the image of his Son (Rom. 8:29).”

When we sing these truths on Sunday, we don’t simply sing them because they’re inspiring. No, first and foremost we sing them because they’re true of who God is. The love of God is so entirely unlike the way that we love. If we’re honest, we tend to love with strings attached, expecting something in return for our sacrifice and efforts. But God loves us with the complete knowledge that we are fickle beings; he loves us despite who we are when we come to him asking for grace, and we can be confident that this grace covers us when we are faithless. God is faithful when we are faithless.

Because God is never changing and faithful to love when we don’t, we can sing these truths over one another as well. Make no mistake, if you have called upon Jesus as your savior and the Lord and leader of your life, your status as loved and redeemed is decided once and for all by a God who never goes back on his decisions.

It is so easy to allow our circumstances to determine what we think about God and think about ourselves. This song always reminds me that my walk with Christ is not about me, my goodness, my works, or my ability to love, but instead about Christ, his goodness, his righteousness manifested in me, and his ability to love without relent.

No matter who you are, where you’re coming from, or what you’ve done, remember that the love and work of Jesus is stronger than your sin. You are covered by the relentless and perfect love of God. More than that, though sin has distorted the image of God in you, the love of God is restoring you to the image of Jesus that you might join him in bringing that restoration to the world around you.

God loves you and in his love you have new purpose, new life, and a new nature. Let’s sing this over one another, singing an unchanging truth that’s founded in an unchanging God.

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Behold Our God

from Pastor Steve Berg

This Sunday we will begin learning a new song as a congregation. The song is called “Behold Our God”. It’s important for us to understand why we’re singing the words that we are when we sing to the Lord. Colossians 3:15-16 is one of the most informative and compelling passages of scripture when it comes to why the Church through the ages worships through song.

Worship is far more than the songs we sing, but singing is one of the main ways God has ordained that we express our worship. Why?

For one. Singing builds and maintains unity as a church. God is the sole object of our worship, but our songs are truths sung to and over one another. As a body we declare, affirm, and encourage one another with our songs.

Singing is also a God ordained medium given to us to remember his promises, his presence, his power, his provision, and his person (his character). This is what the song "Behold our God" accomplishes. While we want to be emotionally authentic before God, This song will help engage the ever-changing reality of our emotions with the rock solid truth of God’s word.

The song comes directly from Isaiah 40. Hear the words of the prophet -

Go on up to a high mountain,
O Zion, herald of good news;
lift up your voice with strength,
O Jerusalem, herald of good news;
lift it up, fear not;
say to the cities of Judah,
“Behold your God!”

God has been reminding me a lot lately about the power and importance of this one word; remember.

Why the continual call to remember?

We have an age-old problem: we forget and we neglect. We turn our hearts and minds to other things daily, if not every hour.

God, in his mercy, calls us over and over again to simply remember and not forget or neglect who He is. Who He is matters most.

The Song Behold our God provides a chance for us as a church community to come together, slow down from the chaos of life, and together set our minds on who God us. It’s so good to bring our pain, our fear, our anxiety, our hurt, and our stresses before God. May we always come honestly before the Lord. But may we never let those emotions rule our hearts. May we know. May we declare. May we listen. May we sing; He alone is God. 

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